Information for Authors

The Journal of the Philippine Dermatological Society (JPDS) is theofficial publication of the Philippine Dermatological Society (PDS). The JPDS, first published in 1991, is designed to meet the continuing education needs of the PDS members and the medical community. The JPDS is issued bi-annually to the PDS members and considers original articles related to dermatology for publication. The JPDS also considers studies conducted in the Philippines that have been published in other scientific journals, in either their original or modified or abstract form, with the written permission of the publisher and principal author. The online journal can be accessed at https://journal.pds.org.ph/.

A submitted manuscript is evaluated by a member of the editorial staff, in terms of content, flow of ideas and the format of the different parts of the manuscript (from title to the reference section). The editors shall check the manuscript and when necessary, shall be sent back to the author(s) for revisions. Once approved, the article shall be sent to at least two (2) peer reviewers who shall comment on the scientific accuracy and relevance of the manuscript. Each peer reviewer shall fill out a form where he/she writes his/her comments and suggestions, and states if the article is acceptable for publication, acceptable with revisions, or unacceptable for publication. The comments of the reviewer will be sent to the author(s) who, in turn, will be required to submit a written answer to the questions of, or address the concerns of the reviewer point by point, as well as revise the paper accordingly. In case the reviewer writes a commentary that the editors consider worth publishing, the commentary is shown to the author(s); and, if the author(s) and reviewer(s) mutually agree to publish the comments, it will be printed at the end of the article. A request to submit a revised document does not guarantee that it will be accepted, only that it will be reconsidered, if the necessary data have been added, all comments have been addressed and when deemed necessary, after additional peer review. The final decision to publish a manuscript is made by the editor-in-chief after consulting the editorial board. The manuscript will be reviewed by a copy editor after it has been approved for publication. The editor-in-chief communicates with the editorial adviser for any problems or concerns that may arise during the editorial process.

Contributions are reviewed by peers selected by the Editorial Board, composed of fellows of the PDS and international experts in their field of (sub) specialty.

The JPDS employs a confidential and anonymous peer review process. The author(s) may suggest reviewers for their manuscript and the Editorial Board will attempt to use at least one suggested reviewer.

Statements and opinions expressed in the articles and communications published are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the editor(s) or of the PDS.

The following sections are features of the journal:

1. Editorial: Brief, substantiated commentaries on limited subjects.

2. Let’s Hear From A Colleague: Contributions from members of the PDS or other health professionals that provide updates on specific topics relevant to dermatologists

3. ABC’s (Application of Basic Concepts) in Dermatology Research: Contains an overview of unique and basic concepts in research and how they can be applied properly in the field of dermatology.

4. Systematic Review/Meta-analysis/Current Evidence: Current evidence is a summary of systematically searched and appraised current evidence regarding focused problems or questions. A systematic review answers a defined research question by collecting and summarizing all empirical evidence that fits pre-specified eligibigility criteria. A meta-analysis is the use of statistical methods to summarize the results of these studies.

5. Clinical Trials/Experimental Research: Original, in-depth clinical or investigative laboratory research articles.

6. Observational Studies: Original, in-depth observational studies such as cohort, case-control, cross-sectional research

7. Case Reports/Case Series: In depth reports of individual patient or series of patients that are of unusual interest.

8. What lies beneath: Pearls in Dermatopathology and Dermoscopy: Clinical, histopathological and dermoscopic correlation of rare diseases.

9. Tropical Grove: Case reports on rare tropical diseases such as deep fungal infections, cutaneous tuberculosis, Hansen’s disease, parasitic infections, bites and stings.

10. Brief communications: Brief descriptions of case reports or clinical observations of unusual interest. Maximum of four double-spaced typewritten pages, maximum of two figures. No abstract.

11. Announcements/Schedules of meetings: Announcements of ongoing and future PDS activities, such as continuing medical education, board examination schedules, conventions (local and international).

Figure 1. Flow diagram of the editorial process.

*The submitted manuscript should be accompanied by a submission or cover letter from the corresponding author. The cover letter should contain a statement that the manuscript has been seen and approved by all authors. If the author is a resident physician, the supervising consultant must also read and approve the manuscript, as indicated by his/her signature in the submission letter. The cover letter should also contain additional information that may be helpful to the editors, such as the type of article that the manuscript represents in the journal, information on publication of any part of the manuscript, and >whether the authors will be willing to meet the cost of reproducing additional color illustrations. The corresponding author should also send authorization/permission needed to reproduce published material or to use figures of identifiable subjects.

The criteria for preparation of manuscripts are adapted from the Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals established by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors ( http://www.icmje.org/.)

To ensure that submitted manuscripts are complete and transparent, the JPDS requires authors to submit reporting guidelines in accordance with the EQUATOR network initiative. EQUATOR (Enhancing the QUAlity and Transparency Of health Research) is an international collaboration dedicated to improving the quality and transparency of health research literature, primarily through promoting the use of reporting checklists. https://www.equator-network.org/reporting-guidelines/

For case reports, authors should submit an accomplished CARE checklist: http://www.care-statement.org/ http://www.care- statement.org/writing-a-case-report.

For reports on observational studies (cross sectional, case control, cohort studies, combinations thereof), authors should submit an accomplished STROBE checklist: https://www.strobe-statement.org/.

For reports of randomized controlled trials, authors should submit an accomplished CONSORT checklist: http://www.consort- statement.org/. For reports of meta-analysis or systematic reviews, authors should submit an accomplished PRISMA checklist: http://www.prisma-statement.org/.

For studies not classified as above, kindly search for your appropriate checklist using the “Search for reporting guidelines” tool in the EQUATOR website: http://www.equator-network.org/.

These guidelines provide sets of recommendations comprising lists of items to report and patient flow diagrams, if applicable.

Manuscripts should be submitted either electronically (via email) or on white bond paper, 8 1⁄2 X 11 inches (one side only) with margins of at least one (1) inch on all sides. Use double spacing throughout, including the title page, abstract, text, acknowledgements, references, tables, and legends for illustrations. Number pages consecutively, beginning with the title page. Type the page number in the upper or lower right- hand corner of each page. Manuscripts will be reviewed for possible publication with the understanding that they are being submitted to one journal at a

time and have not been published, simultaneously submitted, or already accepted for publication elsewhere. This does not preclude considerations of a manuscript that has been rejected by another journal or of a complete report that follows publication of preliminary findings elsewhere, usually in the form of an abstract. Copies of any possible duplicative published material should be submitted with the manuscript that is being sent for consideration.> The manuscript shall be reviewed by the Editorial Board and by the peer reviewers chosen by the Editorial Board. The manuscript may undergo revisions before it can be published. For each revision, submit the revised manuscript, together with the previous manuscript containing the comments and corrections, within one to two weeks from the time the edited manuscript was returned.

A. REQUIREMENTS FOR SUBMISSION

1. MANUSCRIPT

Please submit an electronic copy of your original manuscript and all attachments to the Editor-in-Chief (jpds.editor@gmail.com) 1. Submission letter/cover letter 2. Duly accomplished JPDS Authorship Affirmation Form 3. Single copy of the manuscript (see below for specific instructions) which should include:

a. Title page b. Abstract c. Text of the article d. References e. Tables f. Legends g. Keywords

4. Illustrations/figures and photographs (JPEG or GIF format; minimum 100kb, 300dpi), properly labeled 5. Patient consent letters (for publication of photographs) 6. Statement checklists (Please see III. reporting guidelines to check the website/links)

a. CONSORT checklist for randomized controlled trials b. PRISMA checklist for systematic reviews and meta-analysis c. CARE checklist for case reports d. STROBE checklist for observational studies

7. Permission letters to reproduce material published previously, if applicable 8. Approval form from the Institutional Review Board, if applicable 9. Completed Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest form, if applicable

2. STYLE

Manuscripts must conform to acceptable English usage. Abbreviations must be limited primarily to those in general usage.

3. TITLE PAGE

The title page should contain:

(3.1)  Article Title

a. Concise titles are easier to read than long, convoluted ones. Titles that are too short may, however, lack important information such as study design (which is particularly important in identifying randomized, controlled trials) b. Authors should include all information in the title that will make electronic retrieval of the article both sensitive and specific.

(3.2)  Name of Author(s)

a. Format: First name, Middle Initial, Last name

b. Indicate institutional affiliations including the highest academic position of the author(s)

(3.3)  Name of department(s) and institution(s) to which the work should be attributed.

(3.4)  Contact information for corresponding author.

a. Indicate the name, mailing address, telephone and fax numbers and email address of author responsible for correspondence about the manuscript

b. Corresponding author may or may not be the “guarantor” for the integrity of the study

c.  Corresponding author should indicate clearly whether his or her email address can be published

(3.5)  Disclaimer of possible conflicts of interests, if any. 

(3.6)  Source(s) of support in the form of grants, equipment, drugs or all of these, if any.

4. AUTHORSHIP

The journal’s authorship criteria are adapted from those of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE)> and are delineated on the JPDS Authorship Affirmation Form, which must be signed by each author. All individuals, involved in the preparation and writing of each paper, who meet the JPDS authorship criteria must be listed as authors.

5. INTEREST FORM

The purpose of this form is to provide readers of the manuscript with information about interests that could influence how they perceive and understand the manuscript at hand. Each author should submit a separate form and is responsible for the accuracy and completeness of the submitted information.

6. ABSTRACT AND KEYWORDS

The second page should carry the abstract of not more than 250 words typed double-spaced on a separate sheet of paper.

For clinical trials/ experimental research, observational research, and systematic reviews, the abstracts of papers submitted for publication should be structured and organized as follows:

Background: What is the major problem that prompted the study? Objective: What is the purpose of the study? Methods: How was the study done? Results: What are the most important findings? Conclusion: What is the single most important conclusion?

For case reports and case series, the abstract and manuscript should have the following headings:

Introduction: Why is this case important enough to report? Case Report: What are the details of the case? Conclusion: How would you summarize the case report? What is the most important conclusion?

These headings must be used before each description. In the abstract, it is not permissible to state that the results or other data will be presented or discussed. Use only approved abbreviations.

Below the abstract, provide and identify 3 to 10 key words or brief phrases that will assist the indexers in cross-indexing your article and that may be published with the abstract. Use terms from the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) list of Index Medicus. If MeSH terms are not available for recently introduced terms, present terms may be used.

7. TEXT

The text of observational and experimental articles is usually, but not necessarily, divided into sections with the following headings: Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion.

Lengthy articles may need subheadings within some sections to clarify their content, especially the Results and Discussion sections. Other types of articles such as case reports, reviews, and editorials may need other formats. The authors should consult the journal editors for further guidance.

Introduction: Provide a context or background for the study i.e., the nature of the problem and its significance. Summarize relevant issues on the

The names, highest academic degree and affiliations of person(s) who contributed writing the paper or analyzing the data who do not meet the authorship criteria must be included in the paper’s Acknowledgement section, along with a disclosure of any pertinent conflicts of interest. Individuals listed in the Acknowledgement section because of such contributions to the work should provide written consent. A paper with corporate (collective) authorship must specify the key persons responsible for the article. Editors may require authors to justify the assignment of authorship.

All authors need to disclose any possible conflict of interests and complete the JPDS Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest Form (Appendix B) whose format is based on the ICMJE Conflict disease/s under investigation. Include burden of the disease or its incidence rate locally and/or internationally. State the rationale, the specific purpose or research objective of, or hypothesis tested by the study. Both the main and secondary objectives should be clear, and any pre-specified subgroup analyses should be described. Provide only pertinent references, and do not include data or conclusions from the work being reported.

Methods: The Methods section should include only information that was available at the time the plan or protocol for the study was being written; all information obtained during the study belongs in the Results section.

(7.1) Selection and Description of Participants

Specify the research design, inclusive dates when the study was conducted, where it was conducted and the eligibility criteria. Describe your selection of the observational or experimental participants (patients or laboratory animals, including controls) clearly, the inclusion and exclusion criteria and a description of the source population. The guiding principle should be clarity about how and why a study was done in a particular way.

When reporting experiments on human subjects, indicate whether the procedures followed were in accord with the ethical standards of the Committee on Human Experimentation of the institutions in which the experiments were done, or were in accord with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975. State if your protocol was submitted and approved by the Ethical Review Board of your institution. We will not be publishing papers that are not approved by the Ethical Review Board of the institution where the study was conducted. When reporting experiments on animal subjects, indicate whether the institution’s or the National Research Council’s guide for the care and use of laboratory animals was followed.

(7.2) Technical Information

Identify the methods, apparatus (give the manufacturer’s name and address in parentheses), and procedures in sufficient detail to allow others to reproduce the results. Give references to established methods, including statistical methods. Provide references and brief descriptions of methods that have been published but are not well known. Describe new or substantially modified methods, give the reasons for using them, and evaluate their limitations. Identify precisely all drugs and chemical used, including generic name(s), dosage(s), and route(s) of administration. Authors submitting review manuscripts should include a section describing the methods used for locating, selecting, extracting and synthesizing data. These methods should also be summarized in the abstract.

(7.3) Statistics

Describe statistical methods with enough detail to enable a knowledgeable reader with access to the original data to verify the reported results. Include details how you computed for the sample size. When possible, quantify findings and present them with appropriate indicators of measurement error or uncertainty (such as confidence intervals). Avoid relying solely on statistical hypothesis testing, such as the use of p values, which fails to convey important information about effect size. References for the study design and statistical methods should be to standard works when possible (with pages stated) rather than to papers where designs or methods were originally reported. Define statistical terms, abbreviations, and most symbols. Specify the computer software used. Report how you handled losses to observations (i.e. dropouts from a clinical trial).

Results: Tables should be self-explanatory and numbered sequentially in Roman numerals in order of their mention in the text. Do not repeat all the data in the tables or illustrations in the text; emphasize or summarize only the most important observations. Extra or supplementary materials and technical detail can be placed in an appendix where they will be accessible but will not interrupt the flow of the text or they can be published solely in the electronic version of the journal. When data are summarized in the Results section, give numeric results not only as derivatives (e.g. percentages) but also as the absolute numbers from which the derivatives were calculated, and specify the statistical methods used to analyze them. When reporting means, include the standard deviation, and in reporting relative risks, include the confidence interval. Restrict tables and figures to those needed to explain the argument of the paper and to assess supporting data. Use graphs as an alternative to tables in many entries; do not duplicate data in the graphs and tables. Avoid nontechnical uses of technical terms in statistics, such as “random” (which implies a randomizing device), “normal”, “significant”, “correlation”, and “sample”.

Discussion: Emphasize the new and important aspects of the study and conclusions that follow from them. Do not repeat in detail the data or other information given in the Introduction or the Results sections. For experimental studies, it is useful to begin the discussion by briefly summarizing the main findings, then explore possible mechanisms or explanations for these findings, compare and contrast the results with other relevant studies, state the limitation/s of the study and explore the implications of the findings for future research and for clinical practice.

Conclusion: Link the conclusions with the goals of the study but avoid unqualified statements and conclusions not completely supported by the data. Avoid claiming priority and alluding to work that has not been completed. New hypotheses may be stated when warranted, but label them clearly as such.

Rapini, RP, Bolognia, JL, Jorizzo, JL. Dermatology. 2nd ed. St. Louis: Mosby; 2007.

(7.4) Chapters in books

Leung DY, Eichenfield LF, Boguniewicz M. Atopic dermatitis (atopic eczema). In: Wolff K, Goldsmith LA, Katz SI, Gilchrest BA, Paller AS, Leffell DJ, eds. Fitzpatrick’s Dermatology in General Medicine. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc; 2008:146 –158.

(7.5) Dissertation or Thesis

Ramirez AT. Experimental wound healing in man (Dissertation). Boston, MA: Tufts University.1965, 128 p.

(7.6) Electronic material

Taheri, Arash; Cantrell, Jacob; & Feldman, Steven R.(2013). Tachyphylaxis to topical glucocorticoids; what is the evidence?. Dermatology Online Journal. 19(7). doj_18954. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/87v5x7hf.

(7.7) Tables

Tables capture information concisely and display it efficiently; they also provide information at any desired level of detail and precision. Including data in tables rather than text frequently makes it possible to reduce the length of the text. Type or print each table with double-spacing on a separate sheet. Number tables consecutively in the order of their first citation in the text and supply a brief title for each. Do not use internal horizontal and vertical lines. Give each column a short or an abbreviated heading. Authors should place explanatory matter in footnotes, not in the heading.

Explain all nonstandard abbreviations in footnotes and use the following symbols in sequence: *, †, ‡, §, ||, ¶, **, ††, ‡‡, §§, ||||, ¶¶, etc..

Identify statistical measures of variation such as standard deviation (SD) and standard error of mean (SEM). Be sure that each table is cited in the text. If you use data from another published or unpublished source, obtain permission and acknowledge fully. Additional tables containing back-up data may too expensive to publish in print may be appropriate for publication in the electronic version of the journal, deposited with an archival service, or made available to readers directly by the author(s). An appropriate statement should be added to the text to inform readers that this additional information is available and where it is located. Submit such tables for consideration with the manuscript so that they will be available to the peer reviewers. Recommendations, when appropriate may be included.

(7.8) ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Acknowledge only persons or agencies that have made substantive contributions to the study. Authors are responsible for obtaining written permission from everyone acknowledged by name because readers may infer their endorsement of the data and conclusions.

(7.9) REFERENCES

References should be numbered consecutively in the order in which they are first mentioned in the text. Identify references in text, tables, and legends by Arabic numerals in parentheses. References cited only in tables or figure legends should be numbered in accordance with the sequence established by the first identification in the text of the particular table or figure. The titles of journals should be abbreviated according to the style used in the list of Journals Indexed for MEDLINE, posted by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) on the library’s website. The Uniform Requirements Style for References is based largely on an American National Standards Institute Style adapted by the NLM for its databases. Authors may also consult sample references from the ICMJE (www.nlm.nih.gov/bsd/uniform_requirements.html) for a list of reference examples extracted from or based on the publication Citing Medicine for Easy Use by the ICMJE Audience; these sample references are maintained by NLM.

Avoid using abstracts as references. Avoid citing personal communications or unpublished observations unless they provide essential not available from a public source, in which case the name of the person and date of communication should be cited in parentheses in the text. For scientific articles, obtain written permission and confirmation of accuracy from the source of a personal communication.

The references must be verified against the original documents by the author(s). Examples of correct forms of references are given below (list the first six authors followed by et al):

(7.10) Journals

Cribier B, Scrivener Y, Grosshans E. Tumors arising in nevus sebaceous: a study of 596 cases. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2000; 42(2):263-‐‐8.

(7.11) Books

Rapini, RP, Bolognia, JL, Jorizzo, JL. Dermatology. 2nd ed. St. Louis: Mosby; 2007.

(7.12) Chapters in booksLeung DY, Eichenfield LF, Boguniewicz M. Atopic dermatitis (atopic eczema). In: Wolff K, Goldsmith LA, Katz SI, Gilchrest BA,Paller AS, Leffell DJ, eds. Fitzpatrick’s Dermatology in General Medicine. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc; 2008:146–158.

(7.13) Dissertation or ThesisRamirez AT. Experimental wound healing in man (Dissertation). Boston, MA: Tufts University.1965, 128 p.

(7.14) Electronic materialTaheri, Arash; Cantrell, Jacob; & Feldman, Steven R.(2013). Tachyphylaxis to topical glucocorticoids; what is the evidence?.Dermatology Online Journal. 19(7). doj_18954. Available from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/87v5x7hf.

a. ILLUSTRATIONS OR FIGURES

Figures should be professionally drawn and photographed, or submitted as photographic-quality digital prints. In addition, the author(s) should supply electronic files of figures, clinical pictures, x-ray films, scans and other diagnostic images, as well as pictures of pathology specimens or photomicrographs in JPEG format (minimum 100kb or 300 dpi). Letters, numbers, and symbols on figures should be clear and consistent throughout, and large enough to remain legible when the figure is reduced for publication. Titles and detailed explanations belong in the legends for illustrations — not on the illustrations themselves. Legends for illustrations should be typed double-spaced and inserted after the references. Photomicrographs should have internal scale markers. Symbols, arrows, or letters used in the photomicrographs should contrast with the background. Photographs of potentially identifiable people must be accompanied by written permission to use the photograph. Figures should be numbered consecutively according to the order in which they have been cited in the text. If a figure has been published previously, acknowledge the original source and submit written permission from the copyright holder to reproduce the material. Permission is required, regardless of authorship or publisher, except for documents in the public domain.

Policy on image alteration: Any image alteration from the original using programs such as Photoshop must be explained and justified in the legend.

Patient consent must accompany recognizable photographs of patients at the time of submission. Photograph and text (such as details in the case report or genetic pedigree) must be de- identified to protect patient confidentiality unless patient consent has been documented. Black bars over the eye region are not permitted. In the event that patient consent has not been documented, the author or the publisher can do blurring of the eye region. The altered figure must still be unidentifiable unless documentation of patient consent is provided.

b. ABBREVIATIONS:

Use only standard abbreviations; use of nonstandard abbreviations can be confusing to readers. The full term for which an abbreviation stands should precede its first use in the text unless it is a standard unit of measurement. Abbreviations are indicated in parenthesis after the full term. Authors may consult the Scientific Style and Format by the Council of Biology Editors or the Manual of Style by the American Medical Association for official abbreviations used in manuscripts. Abbreviations in the title are not acceptable and they should be avoided in the abstract whenever possible. Measurements of length, height, weight and volume should be reported in metric units (meter, kilogram or liter) or their decimal multiples. Temperature units should be in degrees Celsius. Blood pressure measurements should be in millimeters of mercury. Hematological and clinical chemistry measurements should be reported in the metric system in terms of the International System of Units (SI). Editors may request that alternative or non- SI units be added by the author before publication.

c. SUBMISSION OF CONTRIBUTIONS

Copies of the manuscript, illustrations, and other contributions or correspondence should be addressed to the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the Philippine Dermatological Society. Please email to jpds.editor@gmail.com

Johannes F. Dayrit, MD, FPDS Editor-in-Chief Journal of the Philippine Dermatological Society Room 1015 South Tower Cathedral Heights Building Complex St. Luke’s Medical Center E. Rodriguez Avenue, 1102 Quezon City Tel. No. (632) 723.0101 loc. 2015 Telefax: (632) 727.7309

* REFERENCE: International Committee of Medical Journal Editors [http://www.ICMJE.org/manuscript_1prepare.html]. Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals: Manuscript Preparation and Submission: Preparing a Manuscript for Submission to a Biomedical Journal [internet; cited 2010 Sept 08]. Available from: http://www.ICMJE.org.

Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest Form

The purpose of this form is to provide readers of your manuscript with information about your other interests that could influence how they perceive and understand your work. Each author should submit a separate form and is responsible for the accuracy and completeness of the submitted information. The form is in four parts.

Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest Form

The purpose of this form is to provide readers of your manuscript with information about your other interests that could influence how they perceive and understand your work. Each author should submit a separate form and is responsible for the accuracy and completeness of the submitted information. The form is in four parts.

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What People Are Saying

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE JPDS

"Never did I doubt in my heart that the Journal of the Philippine Dermatological Society (JPDS) would be beautifully successful. As the official publication of the Philippine Dermatological Society (PDS), the JPDS is designed to meet the continuing education needs of the PDS members and the medical community. Now that the JPDS is going online, more dermatologists will benefit…around the world!

Congratulations to PDS!  To Dr. Johannes Dayrit (Editor-in-chief) and to the JPDS editorial board and staff, you worked really hard for this, and now that you finally got it, please accept my heartiest congratulations. You all made me and the PDS members so proud."

Evangeline B. Handog, MD, FPDS
First Woman President, International Society of Dermatology (2013-2017)
Member, Editorial Board, International Journal of Dermatology
Active Consultant, Dept. of Dermatology, Asian Hospital and Medical Center
Volunteer Consultant, Dept. of Dermatology, Research Institute for Tropical Medicine

Congratulations on this achievement!

"The JPDS to reach the level of accessibility over the internet accords great prestige and merit to our society and members. We can now lay claim that the Philippine Dermatological Society through this online journal has embedded us in academic and research infrastructure.

Congratulations on this achievement!  Together with the diligence and perseverance of the peers before them, the JPDS team led by our dashing Dr. Johann Dayrit, has solidified years of hard work to reach this pinnacle of excellence. We are now at the forefront of sharing knowledge and information, characteristics of a maturing scientific commune of dermatologists."

Ma. Purita (Peachy) Paz - Lao MD FPDS
Vice-President, Philippine Dermatological Society

Congratulations to Editor Johannes Dayrit and his team for making the dream come true!

"I learned dermatology in the U.S. and from teachers and mentors in other countries. So I dreamed that one day we PDS dermatologists would share real-world experiences, research done on our diverse skin types and medicines derived from our vast natural resources.

This launch provides a more immediate, accessible, and impactful way to reach a far wider audience. In this way the PDS DermAuthority can also teach, mentor and help shape dermatology better than ever before. Congratulations to Editor Johannes Dayrit and his team for making the dream come true!"

Vermén M. Verallo-Rowell, MD, FPDS, FAAD
Chair, Skin and Cancer Foundation Inc.
Program Director, VMV Skin Research Centre + Clinics

Thumbs up to the digitalization of the Journal of the Philippine Dermatological Society!

"This will certainly make the journals more accessible and increase readership both locally and internationally. Looking forward to seeing the journal in e-print!"

Joyce Lee, MD
Senior Consultant Dermatologist
Head, Dermatopathology and Laboratories Division
Head, Hair and Nail subspecialty
National Skin Centre, Singapore

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep

Dear Friends & Colleagues,

These legendary rhymes by Robert Frost behoove the progressionist approach and perseverant hard work of Dr Johannes Dayrit (Chief Editor) and his dedicated Editorial team of the Journal of the Philippine Dermatological Society (JDPS).

Following the digitalization of the journal, this 27-year-old beginning is all set to become a globally acclaimed phenomenon that shall not only widen readership and enhance citations, but will soon make JDPS as one of the most sought-after journals for aspiring authors across the world. The state-of-the-art publications by the members of the PDS in top Dermatology Journals is itself a testimony to the academic riches of our esteemed colleagues from Philippines.

I take pride in announcing that I am immediately submitting one of my favorite case reports to JDPS. My best to the entire team.

DR SIDHARTH SONTHALIA
MD, DNB, MNAMS, FISD

Congratulations to the Philippine Dermatological Society and to the editorial board and staff for the launching of JPDS online!

Dr. Flora Xiang MD, PhD
President, Asian Society of Pigment Cell Research
Vice-President, Chinese Dermatological Association

Congratulations to the Philippines Dermatological Society on the launch of the online version of its journal.

 This is an important milestone as it will allow publications in the journal to be accessible to a worldwide audience. I hope authors will avail the opportunity this provides to develop academic links with the global community.

Prof M Ramam
President, Dermatopathology Society of India; Emeritus Editor, Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology

It is a great pleasure to send a congratulatory message to the Journal of the Philippine Dermatological Society.

I have been associated with the PDS through International Society of Dermatology and the Asian Society for Pigment Cell Research.  I have visited several hospitals in the Philippines and interacted  with many Filipino dermatologists. I  am  aware  of  the  high  standard  of  dermatology  training  and increased emphasis on dermatology  research in the Philippines.  A robust, scientific dermatology journal  is  essential  for  the  progress  of  the  discipline  of  dermatology  in a country. The Journal of the PDS is serving that goal well.  The  Previous  Editors  and current Editor in Chief  have  contributed a  lot  to  uplift  the  standard of  the journal.  JPDS  has reached another  milestone in digitalizing  the  journal  and  making  it  more  easily  accessible to  the  readers.  Getting accredited by  the  Western Pacific Rim Index Medicus  is another progressive  step.

I congratulate  the Editorial Team  of  the  JPDS.  I  hope  that  the journal  will  reach new  heights in the  coming  years!

Clinical Professor Prasad Kumarasinghe, MBBS, MD, FCCP, FAMS, FACD

Consultant Dermatologist

Fiona Stanley Hospital and University of Western Australia

Perth

Australia

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE JPDS

"Never did I doubt in my heart that the Journal of the Philippine Dermatological Society (JPDS) would be beautifully successful. As the official publication of the Philippine Dermatological Society (PDS), the JPDS is designed to meet the continuing education needs of the PDS members and the medical community. Now that the JPDS is going online, more dermatologists will benefit…around the world!

Congratulations to PDS!  To Dr. Johannes Dayrit (Editor-in-chief) and to the JPDS editorial board and staff, you worked really hard for this, and now that you finally got it, please accept my heartiest congratulations. You all made me and the PDS members so proud."

Evangeline B. Handog, MD, FPDS
First Woman President, International Society of Dermatology (2013-2017)
Member, Editorial Board, International Journal of Dermatology
Active Consultant, Dept. of Dermatology, Asian Hospital and Medical Center
Volunteer Consultant, Dept. of Dermatology, Research Institute for Tropical Medicine

Congratulations on this achievement!

"The JPDS to reach the level of accessibility over the internet accords great prestige and merit to our society and members. We can now lay claim that the Philippine Dermatological Society through this online journal has embedded us in academic and research infrastructure.

Congratulations on this achievement!  Together with the diligence and perseverance of the peers before them, the JPDS team led by our dashing Dr. Johann Dayrit, has solidified years of hard work to reach this pinnacle of excellence. We are now at the forefront of sharing knowledge and information, characteristics of a maturing scientific commune of dermatologists."

Ma. Purita (Peachy) Paz - Lao MD FPDS
Vice-President, Philippine Dermatological Society

Congratulations to Editor Johannes Dayrit and his team for making the dream come true!

"I learned dermatology in the U.S. and from teachers and mentors in other countries. So I dreamed that one day we PDS dermatologists would share real-world experiences, research done on our diverse skin types and medicines derived from our vast natural resources.

This launch provides a more immediate, accessible, and impactful way to reach a far wider audience. In this way the PDS DermAuthority can also teach, mentor and help shape dermatology better than ever before. Congratulations to Editor Johannes Dayrit and his team for making the dream come true!"

Vermén M. Verallo-Rowell, MD, FPDS, FAAD
Chair, Skin and Cancer Foundation Inc.
Program Director, VMV Skin Research Centre + Clinics

Thumbs up to the digitalization of the Journal of the Philippine Dermatological Society!

"This will certainly make the journals more accessible and increase readership both locally and internationally. Looking forward to seeing the journal in e-print!"

Joyce Lee, MD
Senior Consultant Dermatologist
Head, Dermatopathology and Laboratories Division
Head, Hair and Nail subspecialty
National Skin Centre, Singapore

The woods are lovely, dark and deep, But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep

Dear Friends & Colleagues,

These legendary rhymes by Robert Frost behoove the progressionist approach and perseverant hard work of Dr Johannes Dayrit (Chief Editor) and his dedicated Editorial team of the Journal of the Philippine Dermatological Society (JDPS).

Following the digitalization of the journal, this 27-year-old beginning is all set to become a globally acclaimed phenomenon that shall not only widen readership and enhance citations, but will soon make JDPS as one of the most sought-after journals for aspiring authors across the world. The state-of-the-art publications by the members of the PDS in top Dermatology Journals is itself a testimony to the academic riches of our esteemed colleagues from Philippines.

I take pride in announcing that I am immediately submitting one of my favorite case reports to JDPS. My best to the entire team.

DR SIDHARTH SONTHALIA
MD, DNB, MNAMS, FISD

Congratulations to the Philippine Dermatological Society and to the editorial board and staff for the launching of JPDS online!

Dr. Flora Xiang MD, PhD
President, Asian Society of Pigment Cell Research
Vice-President, Chinese Dermatological Association

Frequently Asked Questions

Have any questions about how to use the JPDS?
Read about commonly asked questions and their answers.

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